Osteoporosis Articles A-Z

Bone Density Scan - Causes of Osteoporosis

This page contains links to eMedTV Osteoporosis Articles containing information on subjects from Bone Density Scan to Causes of Osteoporosis. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Bone Density Scan
    A bone density scan is similar to an x-ray and measures bone health and response to osteoporosis treatment. This eMedTV page explains how the scan is performed, how it is scored, who should have one, and more.
  • Boneeva
    Boniva, a prescription drug, is used for treating and preventing osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV segment explains how Boniva works and links to more detailed information about the drug. Boneeva is a common misspelling of Boniva.
  • Boneiva
    Boniva is a prescription medicine licensed for preventing and treating osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV Web page explains the effects of the drug and lists its potential side effects. Boneiva is a common misspelling of Boniva.
  • Boneva
    Boniva is a drug that is prescribed to treat and prevent osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV article briefly covers the effects of Boniva and offers general dosing information for the drug. Boneva is a common misspelling of Boniva.
  • Boniva
    Boniva is a prescription drug licensed to prevent and treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV Web page describes the effects of Boniva, explains when and how to take the drug, and lists possible side effects that may occur.
  • Boniva and Breastfeeding
    It is not known whether Boniva passes through breast milk in breastfeeding women. This page of the eMedTV library further discusses Boniva and breastfeeding, and explains the importance of communicating with your physician about your situation.
  • Boniva and Insomnia
    Insomnia is reported in up to 2 percent of women taking Boniva. This article from the eMedTV archives offers more detailed information about Boniva and insomnia, and provides a list of suggestions for improving sleep habits.
  • Boniva and Pregnancy
    The full risks of using Boniva during pregnancy are not known. As this eMedTV page explains, animal studies on Boniva and pregnancy show that the drug may cause a difficult delivery, birth defects, developmental problems, and even death during labor.
  • Boniva Dosage
    For women who are taking monthly doses of Boniva, dosage recommendations typically start at 150 mg. This eMedTV article also offers Boniva dosing guidelines for those who prefer the injectable form of the medicine.
  • Boniva Drug Interactions
    When iron supplements, aspirin, or NSAIDs are taken with Boniva, drug interactions may occur. This eMedTV segment describes other things that may interact with Boniva, such as food and beverages, and explains what may happen as a result.
  • Boniva for Osteoporosis
    Healthcare providers often recommend Boniva for osteoporosis. This eMedTV resource takes a quick look at this topic, with information on how this medication works and a possible "off-label" use. A link to more details on Boniva uses is also included.
  • Boniva Overdose
    Common symptoms of a Boniva overdose may include low calcium levels in the blood, ulcers, and heartburn. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible symptoms of a Boniva overdose and explains what treatment options are available.
  • Boniva Side Effects
    Bronchitis, indigestion, and back pain are among the most commonly reported Boniva side effects. This eMedTV segment lists other common side effects of the drug and describes rare but potentially serious problems that may require medical attention.
  • Boniva Uses
    Boniva uses are primarily concerned with preventing and treating osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV resource explains how the drug helps with bone loss, lists possible "off-label" uses, and discusses giving the drug to children.
  • Boniva Warnings and Precautions
    Boniva may potentially irritate or damage the esophagus and stomach. This eMedTV page lists other possible complications that may occur with Boniva. Warnings and precautions on who should not take the drug are also included in this article.
  • Buniva
    Doctors often prescribe Boniva to postmenopausal women to help prevent and treat osteoporosis. This eMedTV article describes the effects of Boniva and explains what to be aware of before using this drug. Buniva is a common misspelling of Boniva.
  • Calcitonin
    Calcitonin is used for treating a few conditions, including osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV page further explains what the drug is used for, describes its various forms, and lists possible side effects that may occur.
  • Calcitonin Injection for Osteoporosis
    As this eMedTV page explains, calcitonin injection is approved for osteoporosis treatment in certain women. This article describes this drug in more detail and provides a link to more in-depth information.
  • Calcitonin Salmon Injection
    Calcitonin salmon injection is used to treat Paget's disease, osteoporosis, and high blood calcium. This eMedTV resource describes how the medicine works, explains how and when the injection is given, and lists warnings and precautions for the drug.
  • Calcitonin Salmon Injection Dosing
    The best dose of calcitonin salmon injection for osteoporosis treatment has not yet been determined. This eMedTV page does, however, include calcitonin salmon injection dosing guidelines for the treatment of Paget's disease and hypercalcemia.
  • Calcitonin Salmon Injection Drug Interactions
    Bisphosphonate medications may interact negatively with calcitonin salmon injection. This eMedTV Web page explains which bisphosphonate products may cause calcitonin salmon injection drug interactions and describes the possible effects.
  • Calcium
    Calcium is an important mineral found in many foods and dietary supplements. This eMedTV Web page describes its benefits, explains how this mineral works for various uses, and lists side effects that may occur with calcium products.
  • Calcium and Breastfeeding
    Breastfeeding women must get enough calcium, as pregnancy weakens the bones. This part of the eMedTV library further explores the link between calcium and breastfeeding, and explains how much of the vitamin a woman needs while breastfeeding.
  • Calcium and Pregnancy
    Adequate calcium can help strengthen fetal bones during pregnancy. This eMedTV page includes more information on calcium and pregnancy, lists the recommended Adequate Intake (AI) for pregnant women, and explains whether too much calcium is possible.
  • Calcium Deficiency
    Most people will not have any symptoms of calcium deficiency until their bones are significantly weakened. This eMedTV resource describes possible signs of a calcium deficiency, explains how much calcium you need, and covers treatment options.
  • Calcium Dosage
    For general supplementation purposes, calcium dosing is based on the Adequate Intakes (AIs) chart. This eMedTV resource includes other dosage information and describes the different types of calcium products available.
  • Calcium Drug Interactions
    Thiazide diuretics, H2 blockers, and fluoroquinolone antibiotics may cause calcium drug interactions. This eMedTV article contains a more complete list of drugs that may interact with calcium and describes the potential effects of these interactions.
  • Calcium Overdose
    A calcium overdose may cause frequent urination, constipation, or kidney stones. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible overdose symptoms, explains how much calcium is too much, and describes various available treatment options.
  • Calcium Side Effects
    Potential calcium side effects include gas, constipation, and belching. As this eMedTV page explains, while most side effects are mild, some may require medical attention. These more serious side effects of calcium are listed in this article.
  • Calcium Supplement Information
    This eMedTV Web presentation discusses calcium supplements. Information includes what they are used for (and whether they work), along with their safety, dosing, side effects, warnings, precautions, and possible drug interactions.
  • Calcuim
    Calcium is essential for healthy bones and certain important functions in the body. This eMedTV page explores other effects of calcium and explains what to discuss with your doctor before using this product. Calcuim is a common misspelling of calcium.
  • Calcuim Supplements
    Calcium is a mineral that is necessary for healthy bones. This eMedTV resource describes the importance of calcium, explains what it is used for, and explores its effectiveness for various uses. Calcuim supplements is a common misspelling of calcium.
  • Calicium
    The body cannot function without adequate amounts of calcium in the blood. This page on the eMedTV site lists specific benefits of calcium and offers general warnings and precautions for the supplement. Calicium is a common misspelling of calcium.
  • Callcium
    Calcium is a mineral used for supporting bone and teeth structure. This eMedTV page also lists claimed benefits of calcium and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this supplement. Callcium is a common misspelling of calcium.
  • Calsium
    Calcium is an important mineral used for maintaining healthy bones and teeth. This eMedTV Web page further describes the importance of calcium and lists possible side effects of calcium supplements. Calsuim is a common misspelling of calcium.
  • Calzium
    Without adequate amounts of calcium in the body, your bones may break down over time. This eMedTV segment explores the importance of calcium and lists some of the claimed uses of this supplement. Calzium is a common misspelling of calcium.
  • Causes of Osteoporosis
    Aging, certain medications, and certain diseases are some of the most common causes of osteoporosis. This eMedTV segment discusses the causes of this condition in detail and provides suggestions for reducing your risk of developing osteoporosis.
  • Causes of Osteoprosis
    Osteoporosis may be caused by several factors, such as age, diseases, or certain drugs. This eMedTV page covers possible causes of osteoporosis and links to more information. Causes of osteoprosis is a common misspelling of causes of osteoporosis.
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