Osteoporosis Articles A-Z

Evista Side Effects - Information About Osteopenia

This page contains links to eMedTV Osteoporosis Articles containing information on subjects from Evista Side Effects to Information About Osteopenia. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Evista Side Effects
    Hot flashes, joint pain, and swelling are some of the most common side effects of Evista. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at the side effects that can occur with this medication, including those requiring immediate medical attention.
  • Evista Uses
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Evista uses are concerned with both osteoporosis and breast cancer. This article explains why the drug can be used to treat both conditions, how it works in the body, and whether it can be used in children.
  • Evista Warnings and Precautions
    If you have liver or kidney disease, your body may not handle as Evista as well as it should. This eMedTV article provides other Evista warnings and precautions to be aware of. Understanding these can help ensure safe treatment with the drug.
  • Fasamx
    Fosamax is an osteoporosis drug that is available only by prescription. This eMedTV selection gives a brief overview of the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Fasamx is a common misspelling of Fosamax.
  • Fasomax
    Available only by prescription, Fosamax is a drug used to treat osteoporosis and Paget's disease. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief overview of the drug and also includes a link to more information. Fasomax is a common misspelling of Fosamax.
  • Forteo
    Forteo is a prescription drug licensed for the treatment of osteoporosis in men and postmenopausal women. This eMedTV page offers more information on the effects of Forteo, explains how to take the drug, and lists some side effects that may occur.
  • Forteo and Breastfeeding
    At this time, it is not known whether Forteo is safe to use while breastfeeding. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Forteo and breastfeeding, and describes the problems that may occur in a nursing infant whose mother is taking the drug.
  • Forteo and Pregnancy
    In studies on Forteo and pregnancy, the drug caused problems when it was given to pregnant animals. This eMedTV article describes the complications that occurred in the offspring of pregnant rats and mice when Forteo was given during pregnancy.
  • Forteo Dosage
    There is only one recommended Forteo dose for everyone -- 20 mcg injected once daily. This page from the eMedTV Web site contains important Forteo dosage information and includes a list of tips for when and how to administer the injection.
  • Forteo Drug Interactions
    Digoxin and bisphosphonates may cause Forteo drug interactions. This page from the eMedTV library explains what may happen during these interactions, lists specific medicines that can interact with Forteo, and describes how to prevent them.
  • Forteo Injections for Osteoporosis
    A medication given by injection, Forteo is prescribed for the treatment of osteoporosis. This eMedTV selection gives a brief overview of this prescription product and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Forteo Overdose
    Common symptoms of a Forteo overdose may include weakness, nausea, and dizziness. This part of the eMedTV archives lists other possible overdose symptoms and describes the various treatment options available for people who have overdosed on Forteo.
  • Forteo Side Effects
    Common Forteo side effects may include insomnia, nausea, and dizziness. Besides common side effects, this eMedTV resource also lists potentially serious side effects of the drug that should be reported to your healthcare provider right away.
  • Forteo Uses
    Forteo uses are primarily focused on the treatment of osteoporosis in men and postmenopausal women. As this eMedTV page explains, however, it can also be used off-label to treat osteoporosis due to steroid use and osteoporosis in premenopausal women.
  • Forteo Warnings and Precautions
    Since Forteo has not been studied for long-term use, it should not be used for more than two years. This eMedTV segment includes other important information on Forteo. Warnings and precautions for the drug are also listed in this article.
  • Fortical
    Fortical is a medication commonly prescribed to treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV Web page explains how the drug works, offers information on when and how to take it, and lists possible side effects that may occur.
  • Fortical and Breastfeeding
    Women are generally advised to not breastfeed while taking Fortical. This page of the eMedTV archives discusses the link between Fortical and breastfeeding in more detail and explains whether it is likely for the drug to pass through breast milk.
  • Fortical and Dry Mouth
    Dry mouth is a possible side effect of Fortical. This eMedTV page offers more information on Fortical and dry mouth, including an explanation of how common the side effect appears to be. This article also includes a list of tips for obtaining relief.
  • Fortical and Hair Loss
    Hair loss is a rare side effect of Fortical, occurring in less than 1 percent of people. This eMedTV segment discusses Fortical and hair loss in more detail and explains what your doctor may recommend if this side effects occurs during treatment.
  • Fortical and Insomnia
    Insomnia is a rare but possible side effect that may occur during treatment with Fortical. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Fortical and insomnia, including helpful tips for improving sleep habits.
  • Fortical and Pregnancy
    At this time, it is not known for sure whether it is safe for pregnant women to take Fortical. This eMedTV article offers more information on Fortical and pregnancy, and explains what happened when the drug was given to pregnant animals.
  • Fortical Dosage
    For osteoporosis treatment, the suggested Fortical dosage for postmenopausal women is one spray once daily. This eMedTV page offers Fortical dosing precautions and tips, and explains the importance of incorporating calcium and vitamin D in your diet.
  • Fortical Drug Interactions
    Bisphosphonates may potentially interact with Fortical. This article from the eMedTV Web site lists specific bisphosphonate products that can cause Fortical drug interactions and explains what may happen when these medications are taken together.
  • Fortical Nasal Spray
    Fortical nasal spray is a drug used to treat osteoporosis. This part of the eMedTV library gives an overview of this drug, listing some of the precautions to be aware of before starting treatment. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Fortical Overdose
    Taking a Fortical overdose will typically cause low blood calcium. This section of the eMedTV Web site describes the symptoms of low blood calcium and explains the treatment options that are available for a Fortical overdose.
  • Fortical Side Effects
    Potential Fortical side effects include runny or stuffy nose, fatigue, and nausea. This segment of the eMedTV library lists both common side effects of the drug (such as back pain) and rare but potentially serious side effects (such as depression).
  • Fortical Uses
    Fortical uses are primarily focused on the treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. As this eMedTV resource explains, however, Fortical is also occasionally used off-label for treating nerve pain and bone pain, and preventing osteoporosis.
  • Fortical Warnings and Precautions
    Fortical can potentially cause nasal problems. This eMedTV Web page lists other side effects that may occur with Fortical. Warnings and precautions on who should not take the medicine are also included in this article.
  • Fosamax
    Fosamax is a prescription drug that is commonly used to treat osteoporosis and Paget's disease. This eMedTV article offers an in-depth look at the drug, including information on its uses, dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and more.
  • Fosamax and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV page explains, it is not known if Fosamax passes through breast milk in humans. This article offers an overview of Fosamax and breastfeeding, and also stresses the importance of talking to your doctor prior to taking the drug.
  • Fosamax and Pregnancy
    Fosamax is classified as a pregnancy Category C medication. This eMedTV page offers an in-depth discussion on Fosamax and pregnancy, including a summary of animal studies that looked at the effects of the drug on pregnant animals and their babies.
  • Fosamax and Weight Gain
    As this eMedTV page explains, weight gain does not appear to be a Fosamax side effect. This article takes a closer look at this topic, describing how Fosamax performed in clinical trials. It also explains how side effects are determined in these trials.
  • Fosamax Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, the recommended Fosamax dosage for treating osteoporosis in men and postmenopausal women is either 70 mg once weekly or 10 mg once daily. This article also offers helpful tips for those taking the drug.
  • Fosamax Drug Information
    If you have osteoporosis or Paget's disease, you may benefit from a product called Fosamax. This eMedTV selection briefly describes Fosamax, with information on how the drug is taken and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Fosamax Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV segment explains that calcium supplements, aspirin, and even food can interfere with Fosamax if they are taken within 30 minutes of the medication. How these and other Fosamax drug interactions can be avoided is also explained.
  • Fosamax Overdose
    Possible signs of a Fosamax overdose include stomach ulcers, intestinal ulcers, and heartburn. This eMedTV selection offers more information on what to expect from a Fosamax overdose and discusses what to do if you have taken too much of the drug.
  • Fosamax Plus D
    Fosamax Plus D is a drug that can be prescribed to treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and men. This eMedTV page offers an overview of this product, including dosing information, effects of the medicine, and possible side effects.
  • Fosamax Plus D -- Drug Information
    This eMedTV Web page provides some basic drug information on Fosamax Plus D, a drug used to treat osteoporosis and increase bone mass. Topics included in this article include who can use it, possible side effects, and issues to discuss with your doctor.
  • Fosamax Plus D Dosage
    For most people, the recommended dose of Fosamax Plus D is 70 mg/5600 IU, taken once weekly. This page from the eMedTV Web site also provides helpful information and tips on when and how to take your Fosamax Plus D dosage.
  • Fosamax Plus D Drug Interactions
    If cimetidine, orlistat, or aspirin is taken with Fosamax Plus D, drug interactions could occur. This eMedTV Web page contains a list of other medicines that may interact with Fosamax Plus D and describes the effects of combining these drugs.
  • Fosamax Plus D Overdose
    Fosamax Plus D overdose symptoms may include nausea, heartburn, and high calcium levels in the blood. This eMedTV article lists other possible symptoms of an overdose with Fosamax Plus D and describes the various treatment options that are available.
  • Fosamax Plus D Side Effects
    Some of the most common Fosamax Plus D side effects include abdominal pain, gas, and diarrhea. This eMedTV resource lists other possible side effects that have been seen with the drug, including serious ones that should be reported to a doctor.
  • Fosamax Plus D Uses
    Fosamax Plus D is used for the treatment of osteoporosis in men and postmenopausal women. This page from the eMedTV Web site offers more information on what the drug is used for and lists possible off-label Fosamax Plus D uses.
  • Fosamax Plus D Warnings and Precautions
    Fosamax Plus D could potentially irritate or damage the esophagus and stomach. This eMedTV article lists other Fosamax Plus D warnings and precautions to be aware of before starting the drug, including other possible side effects that may occur.
  • Fosamax Side Effects Review
    Common Fosamax side effects include muscle pain and heartburn. This selection from the eMedTV Web site features a detailed list of common and uncommon side effects of the drug, including those that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Fosamax Uses
    Osteoporosis and Paget's disease of the bone are two of the conditions that Fosamax is used to treat. This eMedTV segment provides more information on what the medication is used for, including a list of "off-label" Fosamax uses.
  • Fosamax Warnings and Precautions
    You should not take Fosamax if you have problems with your esophagus, such as difficulty swallowing. This eMedTV page goes into detail about Fosamax, warnings and precautions for the drug, and what to discuss with your doctor prior to taking it.
  • Fosamex
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Fosamax is used to treat osteoporosis and Paget's disease, as well as to prevent osteoporosis in menopausal women. This article gives a brief overview of the drug. Fosamex is a common misspelling of Fosamax.
  • Fosimax Side Effects
    Common side effects of Fosamax include abdominal pain and constipation. This eMedTV segment provides a list of several other side effects that may occur while taking the drug. Fosimax side effects is a common misspelling of Fosamax side effects.
  • Fosmax
    Fosamax (alendronate sodium) is used to treat Paget's disease and osteoporosis. This eMedTV article offers an introduction to the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Fosmax is a common misspelling of Fosamax.
  • Fosomax
    Fosamax is a prescription drug that is licensed to treat Paget's disease and osteoporosis. This eMedTV selection provides a brief overview of the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Fosomax is a common misspelling of Fosamax.
  • Fossamax
    Available by prescription, Fosamax is a drug that is used to treat osteoporosis and Paget's disease. This eMedTV article briefly discusses how the drug is taken and provides a link to more information. Fossamax is a common misspelling of Fosamax.
  • Fozamax
    Fosamax is used for treating and preventing osteoporosis, as well as treating Paget's disease. This eMedTV Web page takes a quick look at this drug and provides a link to more information. Fozamax is a common misspelling of Fosamax.
  • Fozomax
    Osteoporosis and Paget's disease can be treated with Fosamax, a prescription drug. This segment of the eMedTV Web site gives a brief overview of the drug and provides a link to more information. Fozomax is a common misspelling of Fosamax.
  • Generic Actonel
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, generic Actonel is not available at this time. This article takes a closer look at this topic, with details on the factors that could extend the exclusivity period.
  • Generic Actonel With Calcium
    Generic Actonel With Calcium will not be available until at least November 2011. This eMedTV page explains why risedronate and calcium is not the same as a generic version of Actonel With Calcium and gives an overview of how generic drugs are made.
  • Generic Atelvia
    At this time, the earliest generic Atelvia could become available is in 2014. However, as this eMedTV article explains, this period will likely be extended based on other factors. This page also describes what the term "generic name" means.
  • Generic Binosto
    No generic Binosto (alendronate effervescent tablet) is available, as it is protected by certain patents. This eMedTV article offers a discussion on when these patents are expected to expire and when a generic version of the drug might become available.
  • Generic Boniva
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, Boniva (ibandronate sodium) is now available in both brand-name and generic form. This article looks at how the generic version compares to brand-name Boniva and includes details on who manufactures a generic version.
  • Generic Evista
    As you'll see in this eMedTV page, generic versions of Evista (raloxifene) are available. This article takes an in-depth look at these products, telling you what you need to know about strengths, manufacturers, and more.
  • Generic Forteo
    The earliest possible date that generic Forteo could become available is December 2018. As this eMedTV Web page explains, as soon as the patent for Forteo expires in 2018, a number of companies are expected to begin making generic versions of it.
  • Generic Fortical
    There are no generic Fortical products available on the market at this time. This page from the eMedTV library explains when a generic version may become available and describes the differences between Fortical and Miacalcin nasal spray.
  • Generic Fosamax
    As this eMedTV page explains, a generic version of Fosamax is currently available in a number of strengths. This article offers more information, describing how the FDA determines that generic versions of the drug are as good as the brand-name version.
  • Generic Fosamax Plus D
    Fosamax Plus D is not yet available in generic form. This segment from the eMedTV library offers information on when generic Fosamax Plus D may be available and explains the difference between a "generic name" and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Miacalcin Nasal Spray
    As this selection from the eMedTV archives explains, a generic version of Miacalcin nasal spray is now available. This article explains what the drug is used for, who makes it, and how many sprays come in each bottle.
  • Generic Prolia
    Generic "biologic" drugs, including Prolia (denosumab), are not allowed to be manufactured. This eMedTV page explains why there may never be generic Prolia available, including information on the difficulties of trying to make a generic biologic drug.
  • Generic Reclast
    As this eMedTV article explains, Reclast is now available in generic form. This resource explains how generic Reclast compares to the brand-name drug and lists two companies that make this product.
  • Information About Osteopenia
    Are you looking for information about osteopenia? This page of the eMedTV library is a good place to start. It explains how this condition differs from osteoporosis and how it is diagnosed. A link to more information is also included.
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