Osteoporosis Prevention

What About Calcium?

An inadequate supply of calcium over a lifetime contributes to the development of osteoporosis. Many published studies show that low calcium intake appears to be associated with low bone mass, rapid bone loss, and high fracture rates. National nutrition surveys show that many people consume less than half the amount of calcium recommended to build and maintain healthy bones.
 
Good sources of calcium include:
 
  • Low-fat dairy products, such as milk, yogurt, cheese, and ice cream
  • Dark green, leafy vegetables, such as broccoli, collard greens, bok choy, and spinach
  • Sardines and salmon with bones
  • Tofu
  • Almonds
  • Foods fortified with calcium, such as orange juice, cereals, and breads.
 
Depending upon how much calcium you get each day from food, you may need to take a calcium supplement.
 
A person's need for calcium changes over a lifetime. The body's demand for calcium is greater during childhood and adolescence, when the skeleton is growing rapidly, and during pregnancy and breastfeeding.
 
Postmenopausal women and older men also need to consume more calcium. Furthermore, as you age, your body becomes less efficient at absorbing calcium and other nutrients. Older adults also are more likely to have chronic medical problems and to use medications that may impair calcium absorption.
 
Recommended Calcium Intakes (mg/day)
National Academy of Sciences (1997)
Ages
mg/day
Birth-6 months
210
6 months-1 year
270
1-3
500
4-8
800
9-13
1300
14-18
1300
19-30
1000
31-50
1000
51-70
1200
70 or older
1200
Pregnant or lactating
 
14-18
1300
19-50
1000
 
Good Food, Good Bones

Healthy Bones

Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.